Fort Worth Becomes First City in U.S. to Mine Bitcoin, as New York Starts Clampdown
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Fort Worth Becomes First City in U.S. to Mine Bitcoin, as New York Starts Clampdown

5 months ago

Three S9 Bitcoin mining machines are going to operate 24 hours a day in a climate-controlled data center within Fort Worth City Hall.

Fort Worth Becomes First City in U.S. to Mine Bitcoin, as New York Starts Clampdown

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Fort Worth in Texas has become the first city government in America to mine Bitcoin.

Three S9 Bitcoin mining machines are going to operate 24 hours a day in a climate-controlled data center within City Hall.

A six-month pilot program is going to take place, and the equipment has been donated by the Texas Blockchain Council.

Fort Worth's Mayor Mattie Parker officially turned on the machines during a ceremony on Tuesday, and said:

"With blockchain technology and cryptocurrency revolutionizing the financial landscape, we want to transform Fort Worth into a tech-friendly city … These small but powerful machines mark Fort Worth’s larger commitment to becoming a leading hub for technology and innovation."

Officials in the city estimate that each Bitcoin mining machine will use the same amount of energy as a household vacuum cleaner — and it's hoped this will be offset by the value of the BTC that's generated.

Fort Worth says it is the 12th-largest city in the U.S. with a population of more than 800,000 people — and has been ranked as one of the fastest-growing, too.

New York Takes Action

In other developments, New York State has announced that it is clamping down on Bitcoin miners who fail to use energy from sustainable sources.

A two-year ban is being imposed on mining companies who want to establish operations that don't rely on renewable energy — creating a large carbon footprint as a result.

The bill won't affect crypto mining businesses that are already in operation.

Critics of the measures fear that this could cause mining firms to move to other states.

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