Jack Dorsey is No Longer CEO of Block. Instead, He's a 'Block Head'
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Jack Dorsey is No Longer CEO of Block. Instead, He's a 'Block Head'

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7 months ago

It seems that Jack Dorsey's lack of enthusiasm for being referred to as a chief executive officer goes back some time.

Jack Dorsey is No Longer CEO of Block. Instead, He's a 'Block Head'

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Jack Dorsey has declared that he's no longer the CEO of Block.

In a filing to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, he declared that he now wants to be known as "Block Head."

It's the latest rebrand to affect his crypto-focused company — with Square changing its name to Block last December.

Indeed, Dorsey isn't the first entrepreneur to shed the title of CEO.

Last year, Elon Musk announced he wanted to be known as the "Technoking of Tesla," but when it comes to his day-to-day job — and what he's called by most media outlets — he's still a CEO.

It seems that Dorsey's lack of enthusiasm for being referred to as a chief executive officer goes back some time.

Almost 10 years ago, he had tweeted:

"Titles, like 'CEO', get in the way of doing the right thing. Respect to the people who ignore titles, and fight like hell for what is right."

Dorsey might have wanted to take a peek in the dictionary before settling on "Block Head" though, as it means "stupid person."

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Weird Parallels

Jack Dorsey's decision to emulate Musk with his title change comes as Tesla's CE… ahem, Technoking, currently pushes ahead with his ambitious bid to take over Twitter.

The world's richest man currently has a 9.2% stake in the social network, which is vastly larger than Dorsey's holding.

Dorsey had announced he was stepping down as Twitter's CEO last November — and this was significant given how he had previously said he would focus on Bitcoin full time if he ever left this role.

Musk now has the financing he needs to be taken seriously with his takeover bid. Twitter has adopted a "poison pill" strategy in an attempt to reduce his chances of success — and will allow shareholders to buy stock at discounted rates if his stake in the company hits 15%.

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